The BS Thread

Taco Loco

Tired and Lazy, married to ‘The Laundry Fairy’
Boss is French and lives in Paris; I am not sure how well that would go over or where it would end my career.

And your friends prefer American fries vs French fries!
 

balakay

She ain't fat, bruh... She just a lil' thick.
Yeah several of the houses we have looked at didn't have master bedrooms. They had "master suites".
 

TacoXpo

HOAX DENIER
Yeah several of the houses we have looked at didn't have master bedrooms. They had "master suites".
And if the woke has their way as they do here, they are supposed to be called Main Bedrooms and Main Bedroom Suites. We are running towards Idiocracy as fast as we can. Pass the Brondo! I honestly think I would have more confidence in the Federal Govt if we had President Camacho!



camacho-header-2-1.jpg
 

PSU Taco85

Well-Known Member
And if the woke has their way as they do here, they are supposed to be called Main Bedrooms and Main Bedroom Suites. We are running towards Idiocracy as fast as we can. Pass the Brondo! I honestly think I would have more confidence in the Federal Govt if we had President Camacho!



camacho-header-2-1.jpg

we have terms at work that are no longer “socially acceptable to use”. In fact, some douche even had the nerve to spam our entire department by sending out a mass email with such terms. It gave me a good laugh, and it actually made me want to go out of my way to use those phrases even more. Here have you, happy Friday.


Hold down the fort and Circle the wagons - This is a very common phrase in the corporate world. It stems from the settlers and soldiers building forts to resist the stereotypical North American “savage” when they were “on the warpath”.

Eenie meenie miney moe – The explanations for the American versions are varied. Some experts claim that “catch a n****** by the toe” refers to a method of punishment by white owners to slaves who tried to run away. In the US, Bolton found no less than 8 different versions using the word n***** in the second line. Following by different variations of “if he squeals/screams/hollers” and then “let him go/make him pay/send him hum”. These were, Bolton adds, the most favorite versions with American children and found in almost every state.

Nitty Gritty - Theories suggest the expression originally referred to the detritus found in the bottom of boats once a shipment of slaves had been removed from the hold, and was eventually stretched to refer to the slaves themselves. The term was based on finding nits and grits at the bottom of the boat- a nit being the egg of a louse, a parasitic insect that would have been rife among the poor conditions those being transported for slavery would have been kept in. and gritswere the coarse-ground grain, which would have been used as a cheap foodstuff to keep a slave ship’s cargo barely fed over the course of their long, transatlantic journeys.

Hip hip hooray - Some think the first part of the cheer calls back to anti-Semitic demonstrations in 19th century Germany who cheered 'hep hep,' a German herding call, as they forced Jews from their homes across Europe."

Fuzzy Wuzzy - Fuzzy-wuzzy was a racist term used by British soldiers in the 1800s in relation to Black people, who were often stereotyped for their hair texture.

Jimmies - In parts of the Northeast, chocolate sprinkles used as ice cream toppings are often called "jimmies." There are competing opinions on the origin of the term. According to Wright, these brown sprinkles were called jimmies as a form of "othering" from the regular sprinkles. The fact that they are brown suggests to Wright that they represent little Black people. Still other etymologists believe that the term comes from the Jim Crow laws used to segregate the South, with jimmies representing those Black people bound by these laws.

Long time no see - You might think this is a cute thing to say to someone you haven’t seen for a while but it is actually derived from the greeting of a Native American man talking to early settlers. Non-native English speakers, or anyone new to a language, will make these kinds of errors in syntax.

Peanut Gallery - The “peanut gallery” was once used to refer to people — mostly Black people — who were sitting in the cheap seats in vaudeville theaters and would throw peanuts on stage if they didn’t like a performance rather than throwing tomatoes. “The ‘peanut gallery’ was the cheapest and worst part of the theater, and the only option for Black attendees,” the National Urban League said of the phrase in 2018. “No one wanted to sit in the peanut gallery and today, no one wants to hear from the peanut gallery.”

Grandfathered In or Grandfather Clause - A “grandfather clause” exempts certain people or groups from the requirements of a piece of legislation affecting their rights, privileges or practices. The phrase has origins that go back to post-Civil War attempts to undercut the voting power of newly free Black people by creating strict requirements for new voters, including literacy tests, that did not apply to the descendants of those who voted prior to (usually) 1867. On paper, these rules didn’t discriminate, but in practice, everybody understood how they would work: It was white people, by and large, who were “grandfathered in” to vote.

Gyp, Gypped, Jip and Jipped - This one is tied to the term “gypsy,” an offensive term used to refer to the Romani people, who’ve long faced discrimination because of their darker skin and were even enslaved in some parts of Europe.

Uppity - It’s used to disparage a Black person who does not know his or her ‘place’. “‘Uppity’ is a term used by White people to refer to Black people who have the audacity to think well of themselves, to assert unapologetically an opinion that may be outside a white person’s comfort zone or thinking.”

No Can Do – this phrase originally emerged in the 19th century to mocked Chinese immigrants’ speech patterns in English. Very similar to Long time no see

Sold Down the River - The phrase “sold down the river” means to be betrayed to a huge degree. The origin lies in one of the horrors of the American slave system: Those who were “sold down the river” were enslaved people, separated from their families in most cases, and transported via the Mississippi or Ohio river to cotton plantations in states further south.

Basket case - This saying for a person who has difficulty coping was first used during World War I to describe a person who had lost all four limbs and had to be carried in a basket.

Tipping point- When you reach the tipping point in a situation, you have reached the point at which "a change or an effect cannot be stopped." This seems benign enough, but the phrase was used in the '50s and '60s to reference the tendency for white families to move out of a neighborhood once it had been taken over by an African American majority.

Rule of thumb - There’s a lot of controversy around the origins of this term. But it is said to derive from laws in England and America dating back to the 1600s. These laws stated that a man could beat his wife with any stick no wider than his thumb. Hence, the rule of thumb.

Hysterical - The word hysterical derives from the Greek word for uterus. It usually gets tossed around as a description for emotional women and feeds into the sexist stereotype that women are “naturally” crazy. Historically (Male) doctors had a bunch of weird ideas about the biology of women that they used to rationalize sexist beliefs.

Master bedroom - The word “master” harks back to the time of slavery in the United States when white male plantation owners were addressed with the term. But the word also suggests that a master is a man.

Cakewalk - A word often used to denote a task that is easy to perform, the truth behind this word has to do with a different kind of performance that was not so easy. A “cakewalk” was a dancing contest judged by plantation owners — with a cake as the prize.Unbeknownst to those who held people in slavery, it allowed the enslaved dancers to mock and oppose the white Southern elite. Couples dressed in their finest clothing, and according to the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, would dance until the music stopped. Then, dancers would land on a number, and if it was called “they would take the cake.”

Call a spade a spade - For anyone thinking this phrase refers to the playing card suit, take note: The word “spade” is a well-documented derogatory slur toward Black people. The phrase to “call a spade a spade” originated from the Greek phrases “call a fig a fig” and “call a trough a trough.” Since 1542 the phrase used “spade” in reference to the gardening implement, and only later in the early 20th century did the term “spade” get co-opted from Harlem Renaissance writers by white people as a slur for enslaved people.
 

balakay

She ain't fat, bruh... She just a lil' thick.
And if the woke has their way as they do here, they are supposed to be called Main Bedrooms and Main Bedroom Suites. We are running towards Idiocracy as fast as we can. Pass the Brondo! I honestly think I would have more confidence in the Federal Govt if we had President Camacho!



camacho-header-2-1.jpg
I mistyped that. Meant to put "owner's suite".
 

AlienXtx

Nignog

Oswego

n00b
I'm guessing you could give two shitz but tok is saving then distributing your biometric data to the commies who invented it.

And I'm talking:

They know your gate...aka stride (unique like a fingerprint)

Voice print (also unique)

Facial recognition (ugly fucker)
 

AlienXtx

Nignog
I'm guessing you could give two shitz but tok is saving then distributing your biometric data to the commies who invented it.

And I'm talking:

They know your gate...aka stride (unique like a fingerprint)

Voice print (also unique)

Facial recognition (ugly fucker)
So does everything else these days lol
 

TacoXpo

HOAX DENIER
I mistyped that. Meant to put "owner's suite".
Yes. That is the term! oh boy - oops, I better change that to oh bouy.
 

Oswego

n00b
So does everything else these days lol
Not in my house. My cells the only thing that's "live".

Never jumped on the wifi appliance, camera, siri, Alexa bandwagon.

as everyone else is going electronic and automated im going backwards. Keep it simple stupid.

No ones hacking shit here. None of my electronics are even powered. If not in use my spike strips are off. That's mainly due to our power surging weekly and popping off. Also my frugalness and me not wanting to pay for parasitic devices sucking power when not in use.
 

AlienXtx

Nignog
Not in my house. My cells the only thing that's "live".

Never jumped on the wifi appliance, camera, siri, Alexa bandwagon.

as everyone else is going electronic and automated im going backwards. Keep it simple stupid.

No ones hacking shit here. None of my electronics are even powered. If not in use my spike strips are off. That's mainly due to our power surging weekly and popping off. Also my frugalness and me not wanting to pay for parasitic devices sucking power when not in use.
My cells the only thing live too unless I'm using it's Hotspot to stream on my ps4.
 

MatthewMay1

amateur professional
we have terms at work that are no longer “socially acceptable to use”. In fact, some douche even had the nerve to spam our entire department by sending out a mass email with such terms. It gave me a good laugh, and it actually made me want to go out of my way to use those phrases even more. Here have you, happy Friday.


Hold down the fort and Circle the wagons - This is a very common phrase in the corporate world. It stems from the settlers and soldiers building forts to resist the stereotypical North American “savage” when they were “on the warpath”.

Eenie meenie miney moe – The explanations for the American versions are varied. Some experts claim that “catch a n****** by the toe” refers to a method of punishment by white owners to slaves who tried to run away. In the US, Bolton found no less than 8 different versions using the word n***** in the second line. Following by different variations of “if he squeals/screams/hollers” and then “let him go/make him pay/send him hum”. These were, Bolton adds, the most favorite versions with American children and found in almost every state.

Nitty Gritty - Theories suggest the expression originally referred to the detritus found in the bottom of boats once a shipment of slaves had been removed from the hold, and was eventually stretched to refer to the slaves themselves. The term was based on finding nits and grits at the bottom of the boat- a nit being the egg of a louse, a parasitic insect that would have been rife among the poor conditions those being transported for slavery would have been kept in. and gritswere the coarse-ground grain, which would have been used as a cheap foodstuff to keep a slave ship’s cargo barely fed over the course of their long, transatlantic journeys.

Hip hip hooray - Some think the first part of the cheer calls back to anti-Semitic demonstrations in 19th century Germany who cheered 'hep hep,' a German herding call, as they forced Jews from their homes across Europe."

Fuzzy Wuzzy - Fuzzy-wuzzy was a racist term used by British soldiers in the 1800s in relation to Black people, who were often stereotyped for their hair texture.

Jimmies - In parts of the Northeast, chocolate sprinkles used as ice cream toppings are often called "jimmies." There are competing opinions on the origin of the term. According to Wright, these brown sprinkles were called jimmies as a form of "othering" from the regular sprinkles. The fact that they are brown suggests to Wright that they represent little Black people. Still other etymologists believe that the term comes from the Jim Crow laws used to segregate the South, with jimmies representing those Black people bound by these laws.

Long time no see - You might think this is a cute thing to say to someone you haven’t seen for a while but it is actually derived from the greeting of a Native American man talking to early settlers. Non-native English speakers, or anyone new to a language, will make these kinds of errors in syntax.

Peanut Gallery - The “peanut gallery” was once used to refer to people — mostly Black people — who were sitting in the cheap seats in vaudeville theaters and would throw peanuts on stage if they didn’t like a performance rather than throwing tomatoes. “The ‘peanut gallery’ was the cheapest and worst part of the theater, and the only option for Black attendees,” the National Urban League said of the phrase in 2018. “No one wanted to sit in the peanut gallery and today, no one wants to hear from the peanut gallery.”

Grandfathered In or Grandfather Clause - A “grandfather clause” exempts certain people or groups from the requirements of a piece of legislation affecting their rights, privileges or practices. The phrase has origins that go back to post-Civil War attempts to undercut the voting power of newly free Black people by creating strict requirements for new voters, including literacy tests, that did not apply to the descendants of those who voted prior to (usually) 1867. On paper, these rules didn’t discriminate, but in practice, everybody understood how they would work: It was white people, by and large, who were “grandfathered in” to vote.

Gyp, Gypped, Jip and Jipped - This one is tied to the term “gypsy,” an offensive term used to refer to the Romani people, who’ve long faced discrimination because of their darker skin and were even enslaved in some parts of Europe.

Uppity - It’s used to disparage a Black person who does not know his or her ‘place’. “‘Uppity’ is a term used by White people to refer to Black people who have the audacity to think well of themselves, to assert unapologetically an opinion that may be outside a white person’s comfort zone or thinking.”

No Can Do – this phrase originally emerged in the 19th century to mocked Chinese immigrants’ speech patterns in English. Very similar to Long time no see

Sold Down the River - The phrase “sold down the river” means to be betrayed to a huge degree. The origin lies in one of the horrors of the American slave system: Those who were “sold down the river” were enslaved people, separated from their families in most cases, and transported via the Mississippi or Ohio river to cotton plantations in states further south.

Basket case - This saying for a person who has difficulty coping was first used during World War I to describe a person who had lost all four limbs and had to be carried in a basket.

Tipping point- When you reach the tipping point in a situation, you have reached the point at which "a change or an effect cannot be stopped." This seems benign enough, but the phrase was used in the '50s and '60s to reference the tendency for white families to move out of a neighborhood once it had been taken over by an African American majority.

Rule of thumb - There’s a lot of controversy around the origins of this term. But it is said to derive from laws in England and America dating back to the 1600s. These laws stated that a man could beat his wife with any stick no wider than his thumb. Hence, the rule of thumb.

Hysterical - The word hysterical derives from the Greek word for uterus. It usually gets tossed around as a description for emotional women and feeds into the sexist stereotype that women are “naturally” crazy. Historically (Male) doctors had a bunch of weird ideas about the biology of women that they used to rationalize sexist beliefs.

Master bedroom - The word “master” harks back to the time of slavery in the United States when white male plantation owners were addressed with the term. But the word also suggests that a master is a man.

Cakewalk - A word often used to denote a task that is easy to perform, the truth behind this word has to do with a different kind of performance that was not so easy. A “cakewalk” was a dancing contest judged by plantation owners — with a cake as the prize.Unbeknownst to those who held people in slavery, it allowed the enslaved dancers to mock and oppose the white Southern elite. Couples dressed in their finest clothing, and according to the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, would dance until the music stopped. Then, dancers would land on a number, and if it was called “they would take the cake.”

Call a spade a spade - For anyone thinking this phrase refers to the playing card suit, take note: The word “spade” is a well-documented derogatory slur toward Black people. The phrase to “call a spade a spade” originated from the Greek phrases “call a fig a fig” and “call a trough a trough.” Since 1542 the phrase used “spade” in reference to the gardening implement, and only later in the early 20th century did the term “spade” get co-opted from Harlem Renaissance writers by white people as a slur for enslaved people.
Wow.
 

TacoXpo

HOAX DENIER
When I was in a corp deal 35 years ago I had to go to an ethnic sensitivity class. No not because of something I did, it was mandated for 55,000 employees of the company as a way to reduce silly lawsuits. What did I get from the class? I am no longer allowed to say, “Please pass me that black pen.” Now I have to say, “Please pass me that pen that writes with black ink you fucker!” Okay, maybe not the fucker part or the yelling part.
 

TacoXpo

HOAX DENIER
I just saw a post in my company’s site that said that the offices will be closed on Monday in observance of MLK. I posted, “I share in his dream.” Meaning I too would like us to fucking forget about all this color shit - I know for many of you truly racists on here (I am not talking about the modern day definition) you may not understand. I share in the dream that we can all be judged by our character and our actions. I bet you, I will get a memo or some-some saying to be careful or something. I am just so fucking tired of the insanity that Barack Obama and others brought on with making EVERYTHING about color of skin. /rant
 

PSU Taco85

Well-Known Member
I just saw a post in my company’s site that said that the offices will be closed on Monday in observance of MLK. I posted, “I share in his dream.” Meaning I too would like us to fucking forget about all this color shit - I know for many of you truly racists on here (I am not talking about the modern day definition) you may not understand. I share in the dream that we can all be judged by our character and our actions. I bet you, I will get a memo or some-some saying to be careful or something. I am just so fucking tired of the insanity that Barack Obama and others brought on with making EVERYTHING about color of skin. /rant

its a deck of cards folks will continue to play for decades on end just because they can now that the country has opened up that can of worms.
 

TacoXpo

HOAX DENIER
At least my review today went pretty good. Will see what happens when upper management reviews the proposal for more FTEs and a re-org.
I have survived and even thrived reorgs. I always thought reorgs were a symptom of top mgt (I lived there for nearly a decade) were either pussies that wouldn't do what the organization needed or just wrong for the job. IMO real good leaders would make real changes as they were needed. Yes it pisses people off but it also weeds out the ones that just want a job vs ones that want to keep the ship going in the right direction.
 

Silverback

Lima Gulf Bravo Foxtrot Juliet Bravo
Ok.. been home a few hours now.. wife is across the street drinking with the neighborhood women. I can hear them laughing and talking (not sure what they are saying)... anyhow... I think it's my time to step over there and tell her it's time for her to come home and get her dose of Uncle Silverbacks Throat Yogurt. This should go over well.. in my mind at least. :D
 
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